Monday, September 22, 2008

On sculpture and installation variance(s)


Click for video: Quicktime / .m4v for iPod / direct streaming for PC at Blip.tv

" There's an experiential distinction between walking round a sculpture and entering a built structure that encompasses you. You know logically that when you look at things they're fake, because you know the space is not what it's purporting to be. Yet to all intents and purposes your eye tells you that it's real, so you enter a pact with this space, as to whether to believe it or not. It's like when you read the first few pages of a book. You know it's not real, it's a fiction, but you agree somewhere along the line to go along with it and enter this fictive realm. You can almost start to read things subconsciously; you become interested in the spaces, doors and the objects within that space, as opposed to thinking constantly: 'I'm in a piece of art.' Your mind is allowed to wander a little more. "

Performing a local Reality Check, Sam Renseiw investigated an a[mazing] sequence of artfully enclosed, almost empty spaces. View the freshly docu-voodled, oneiric, Borges inspired walk-trough by clicking here, or on the links above. (patafilm # 629, 03'59'', 21.3MB, Quicktime/mov - other versions at Blip.tv)

Today's Bonus Lumiere Video features a sculpture - or, might the moving conglomerate be labelled: installation ? (Lum #150, "flying steamroller" 01'00'', 4.7MB, Quicktime/mov)

Today's Patalab Metaphor Video features a similar enclosed space walk - that sort of made it to Hollywood via New York - back in 2007. (patafilm # 314, 04'01'', [06.12.206 post],18 MB, Quicktime/mov.)

Patalab mourns the recent loss of Mauricio Kagel, the great composer, filmmaker (of fine early voodles) and artist. You can view his fine Ludwig Van (incomplete) voodle at Ubuweb.

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6 Comments:

Anonymous michael szpakowski said...

Gosh! another self portrait , in part. I like the way you didn't over egg it with atmospheric music to help the ..er..atmosphere, but leave us with something altogether more complex and nuanced. We do a little bit of work and it's all the better for it.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 1:45:00 pm  
Blogger Gia said...

Sam, This seems like spam, but it's not (well, not really). Rupert Howe suggested I send this info to you, but I can't find your email address!

It's a short film competition and they are particularly keen on getting entries from Europeans:
http://www.filmaka.com/competition.php?page=current&competition_id=271

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 3:07:00 pm  
Blogger SAM RENSEIW said...

michael:
actually parts of the soundtrack are re-worked, sort of.
until and after the entrance and exit of the installation maze, the sound is "cathedral" amplified, leaving the walk-through somehow more subdued acoustically.

gia: thank you very much your kindness for the link to "filmaka".
very fancy and HD pieces. sot of humbling... let's see what i can come up with, eventually.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 6:21:00 pm  
Blogger Philip Sanderson said...

Funny I was just watching These Are the Damned on Youtube watch the beginning of the scene it is an eerie echo...try watching the patafilm with the sound turned down and the sound turned up on...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHj8TvTfwBk

Thursday, September 25, 2008 10:23:00 pm  
Blogger SAM RENSEIW said...

philip:
yes, indeed!
what an absolutely fabulous travelling in interior space, and such an exquisite, ellaborate soundtrack.
thank you for reminding me of losey.
i did not know "these are the damned", but seem to remenber having seen "eve" and " the "servant" many years ago.
how wonderfull to see things (a)new, and, now having the anticipation for so much more to discover!

Sunday, September 28, 2008 10:04:00 am  
Blogger Philip Sanderson said...

These are the damned is very odd. Its meant to be a horror/sci fi film and yet is so disjointed its more like a sort of Clockwork Orange meets Last year at Marienbad.

Monday, September 29, 2008 4:34:00 pm  

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